ESSAY IN FALL 2017 ISSUE OF ECOTONE

“The Hornpipe and The Rake” appears in this issue centered around the theme of Craft, and containing—cover-to-cover—a multitude of glorious surprises.

For more information follow the link below:

https://ecotonemagazine.org/submissions/upcoming-issues/

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UPDATE: FB LIBRARY / DATABASE OF REMEMBRANCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

I continue to collaborate with German Historian Irmtrud Wojak on the FB LIBRARY / DATABASE OF REMEMBRANCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS. (The project is named in honor of German jurist and campaigner for human rights Dr. Fritz M. Bauer.)

As part of this project, we hope to cultivate a series of creative works. To find information on that “Library Within a Library” go here:

http://www.buxus-stiftung.de/index.php/en/fmb-college/research-topics?id=107

On April 23-24 (2018) I will be co-leading a two-day Exploratory Seminar at Harvard University dedicated to studying the following key questions related to the project:

What tools and methods would make a school curriculum that generates moral and intellectual bravery workable?

What are the obstacles to telling unique stories of resistance effectively, and how might they be surmounted via documentation and narrative ingenuity?

Whereas the academic rule of thumb is impartiality, and impartiality is in some cases impossible to attain, how might stories be told as fairly and fully as possible?

What are the uses of identifying universal parallels between acts and tactics of resistance originating in vastly different regional contexts?

What organizations should we align with to achieve our goals?

When should verification of a story of resistance be considered complete?

How best can we attract users to a definitive database / library of resistance stories?

How does the power of Big Data work for, or against, the vital telling of the stories of individuals who exist as names rather than numbers—people who often are inspired to act not only by tragic facts but also by pre-existing intellectual, spiritual or emotional concerns?

Can truth-tellers and truth-telling organizations be effectively protected against cyber-attacks and campaigns of misinformation?

What are the connections between resistance to injustice and physical and mental health?

FICTION IN FALL 2017 ISSUE OF ST. PETERSBURG REVIEW

“August Bloom Log, Entry 1: Emergence” appears in the fall 2017 issue of St. Petersburg Review.

According to the editors: “The journal was founded in 2007 to honor the spirit of samizdat, the disenfranchised Soviet writers’ practice of publication through whatever means, and to celebrate the Russian literary tradition of perseverance. Over the years we have expanded the scope and breadth of our journal to feature work by writers from more than 50 countries.”

SCHLESINGER LIBRARY PRESENTATION

https://youtu.be/WZFtqbxZ13o

Above is a link to a video of a portion of a presentation delivered last month at Harvard University. Below is the text of the event program. The sex discrimination case referenced is Sharon Johnson v. University of Pittsburgh (Civic Action No. 73-120; United States District Court, Western District of Pennsylvania).

 

“THE GREAT MELT” SNOWBALL CEREMONY

June 14, 2017

Schlesinger Library Research Grant presentation

In connection with the projects:

My Aunt: Chemist, Black Belt, Plaintiff (book chapter)

Year of Discovery: Essay as Sculpture or ENTICEMENT TO ACTION

 

Participants

Snowball, circa terrible Boston winter of 2014-15

Ivelisse Estrada, Snowball Bearer

Kevin Grady, cinematography

Joe LaRocca, fife

Ben Miller, writer

 

There wasn’t a snowball’s chance in the Mojave that M.I.T.

PhD Sharon Johnson would sit back and let the University

of Pittsburgh deny her tenure without a fight….

 

Noon

Snowball Homily, steps of Schlesinger Library

12:10

Snowball Procession, across yard, with fife accompaniment

12:20

Snowball Melts in the Bright Light of Facts

12:40

Discussion

IOWA MURAL SPEAKS! EVENT

CornellReallyBest

On April 20th at Cornell College students and faculty gathered to translate the poem “The Red Wheelbarrow” (William Carlos Williams) into some of the many languages spoken in the urban Midwest, including German, Russian, Portuguese and Spanish. This effort is another in support of my on-going Mural Speaks! project born at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in 2014.